A Wildlife Photography Hack to Make Your Life More Exciting (With Video)

For years, we’ve groaned about the changing of our clocks twice a year. It messes with our systems and causes sleep deprivation. The sun sets far too late or far too early.

Yet, for wildlife photographers, this biannual ritual can lead to some cool pictures.

So.

Embrace Daylight Savings Time. Continue reading

On Descriptions, Exclamation Marks and Some Favorite Photos from January

While writing in my journal yesterday, I tried to describe a measuring instrument I had used at work. I failed miserably, and the entry I had expected to be short turned into an exposition on my feelings about high school English and how it shaped my life.

That was not a good explanation. I really haven’t had the mental capacity to write good descriptions in my journals. I’ve found I like to rely on my photos for my descriptive pieces. 

And plus, when I was in junior high (or maybe it was freshman year), I discovered I really disliked writing descriptions, especially lengthy ones. I felt it was a waste of time and that the writing space could be better filled with something else. I don’t know that I identified what that something else was at that age, but perhaps today, I have identified it: a photograph. Continue reading

“We’ll be birds flyin’ free.” (Unless you’re a weka or a kiwi or a penguin.)

dscf7884-copy
Look out for kiwis! The sign at the entrance to the Oban rugby field. I took a picture of it on New Year’s Eve just in case it was the only picture of a kiwi I would ever take….

I’m not sure how I became interested in hunting for kiwis. Before I came to New Zealand, I saw a really nice picture of the bird and watched some videos from wildlife refuges, and suddenly, I was intrigued by the nocturnal creatures. During my first few months here, I wanted to see one and didn’t care whether I saw it in the wild or at a zoo. But then we came so close to seeing one in Paihia that I knew I wanted to see my first kiwi in the bush and not behind a fence.

Through my travels, I heard about kiwis on Stewart Island. As there are 50 kiwis for every one person who lives there, I wrote a mental note that I needed to visit. Rakiura, as Stewart Island also is known, is located south of the South Island, and “Visit the southernmost point of New Zealand” was on the list of things I wanted to do. Plus, I wanted to be at the bottom of the world to start the New Year, so everything fell together for a trip to Stewart Island at the end of December. Continue reading